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  Brinton Cottage Publishing

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About the book

This book is for old and young alike. The book is a collection of stories and quotations of people’s lives during WW2 and is the result of extensive research by the author. The stories are in the people’s own words and own style.

World War 2 was a dreadful time for anyone involved in the fighting and also for the people who lost loved ones. The bravery and heroics of these groups has been well documented.

There were also many people who were not directly involved with the fighting but who also had difficult times; there were people in the forces who were not on the front line; there were those who were unable to join the forces who did other worthwhile jobs; there were women and children doing ‘men’s work’; and so many more. All these people have stories to tell.

As well as the personal stories there are quotations from people who were children during the War.

We lived near Grangemouth. It was only bombed once. The explosion was huge and could be felt eight miles away. My gran was really fat and weighed 15 stones. She was blown from her chair across the room and landed on top of the sideboard. Other than being a little surprised, she was fine.

All the people whose material has been used in the book were interviewed face to face; talked to on the telephone or they sent written accounts or emails of their lives and experiences. All the stories are from people who are now in their 70’s, 80’s and even in their 90’s - all 101 of them. These people’s memories are as clear today about their experiences as they were when they occurred  over 60 years ago.

Catherine O’Mahony, a contributor and critical reader noted: I enjoyed being reminded of my childhood years, but even more so reading the accounts of those children who, almost overnight, had to become adults and filled jobs left vacant by servicemen and women. The adult’s stories are really interesting, some sad, but the vast majority full of optimism and enjoyment. They showed that having lots of money wasn’t a pre-requisite for happiness.

At the end I felt enormous pride in our country. Everyone played a part in victory, although, at the time, they were just existing from one day to the next.